EQUINE DENTISTRY:

Your Equine Dental Experts

Equine dental care can be provided either in the field or at the clinic. We provide patients a level of dental expertise and veterinary care that non-specialists cannot deliver. Our clinic is equipped with the latest in digital radiography and surgical equipment. This equipment, when coupled with our training and experience, allows us to provide unparalleled equine dental care.

 

Equine dentistry experts

Common Dental Conditions

Your horse's dental care is essential to your horse's well being. Regular examinations and maintenance on their teeth is especially necessary for today's horses. Maintaining your horse's proper dental care has it's rewards with a longer more comfortable future. With proper dental care your horse can utilize feed more efficiently, maintain proper body weight and carry a bit more comfortably when bridled.

Dental care can be provided either in the field or at the clinic. We provide patients a level of dental expertise and veterinary care that non-specialists cannot deliver. Our clinic is equipped with the latest in digital radiography and surgical equipment. This equipment, when coupled with our training and experience , allows us to provide unparalleled equine dental care.

 

Wave Mouth (Uneven Molar Table)

An uneven molar table or wave mouth causes gradual excessive wear to many of the molars resulting in poor utilization of food and eventual tooth loss. A horse chews food from side to side in a rotating manner. Molar problems inhibit the normal grinding motion necessary for eating. Wave mouth may be caused by one of the following conditions:

  • Retained caps (baby teeth)

  • Missing teeth 

  • Hooks

  • Ramping of the molar table 

  • Trauma

 

Floating a horse's teeth

Floating Your Horse's Teeth:

Floating your horse's teeth is rasping or filing the teeth. Floating removes sharp enamel points. These enamel points cause considerable discomfort to the cheeks, gums and tongue. The most common tools used are the floats. They are long handled rasps that are designed just for filing down the teeth.

The floating procedure is only one aspect of a complete dental examination. A full evaluation of your horse's teeth should be done yearly, but in some cases a more frequent exam is necessary. Sharp points occur in most horses over time due to uneven grinding and wear on the horse's molars.

Recently with the advent of motorized dental equipment, veterinarians are now equipped to meet all of your dental needs. There have been many exciting advances in equine dentistry over the past five years that have revolutionized our ability to provide the highest level of dental care.

The clinical signs of dental disease are varied. Some horses show obvious signs of pain and discomfort while other may adapt to the discomfort without showing you any signs of dental problems until they become severe. Listed below are common clinical signs of dental problems.

 

Advanced dentistry for horses is a service at Wisconsin Equine

Examination of your horse's proper dental care can be provided either in the field or at the clinic.
 

Horse head skeleton showing teeth



How Can You Recognize Dental Problems?

  • Dropping feed from their mouth while eating

  • Weight loss

  • Excessive Salivation

  • Foul odor from the mouth

  • Nasal discharge or a swelling on the face

  • Tossing, head tilting or fighting the bit

 

What are Common Dental Problems?

  • Sharp enamel points causing lacerations of cheek and tongue

  • Retained caps (baby teeth that have not been shed)

  • Retained wolf teeth (causes discomfort when bitted)

  • Hooks on premolars and molars

  • Infected teeth and/or gums

  • Congenital defects

  • Periodontal (gum) disease